Restoration

I don’t remember ever seeing this verse before, but I heard it mentioned on a radio show this morning in the context of a discussion about how, in God’s economy, in God’s promise, nothing is finally lost. Not even things that have been lost:

Joel 2:25

I will restore to you the years
that the swarming locust has eaten,

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Man Gave Names To All The Animals

WRITTEN BY: BOB DYLAN

Man gave names to all the animals
In the beginning, in the beginning
Man gave names to all the animals
In the beginning, long time ago

He saw an animal that liked to growl
Big furry paws and he liked to howl
Great big furry back and furry hair
“Ah, think I’ll call it a bear”

Man gave names to all the animals
In the beginning, in the beginning
Man gave names to all the animals
In the beginning, long time ago

He saw an animal up on a hill
Chewing up so much grass until she was filled
He saw milk comin’ out but he didn’t know how
“Ah, think I’ll call it a cow”

Man gave names to all the animals
In the beginning, in the beginning
Man gave names to all the animals
In the beginning, long time ago

He saw an animal that liked to snort
Horns on his head and they weren’t too short
It looked like there wasn’t nothin’ that he couldn’t pull
“Ah, think I’ll call it a bull”

Man gave names to all the animals
In the beginning, in the beginning
Man gave names to all the animals
In the beginning, long time ago

He saw an animal leavin’ a muddy trail
Real dirty face and a curly tail
He wasn’t too small and he wasn’t too big
“Ah, think I’ll call it a pig”

Man gave names to all the animals
In the beginning, in the beginning
Man gave names to all the animals
In the beginning, long time ago

Next animal that he did meet
Had wool on his back and hooves on his feet
Eating grass on a mountainside so steep
“Ah, think I’ll call it a sheep”

Man gave names to all the animals
In the beginning, in the beginning
Man gave names to all the animals
In the beginning, long time ago

He saw an animal as smooth as glass
Slithering his way through the grass
Saw him disappear by a tree near a lake . . .
Copyright © 1979 by Special Rider Music

for next week

We’ll continue our study of Psalm 19, the Psalm C.S. Lewis has called “the greatest poem in the Psalter and one of the greatest lyrics in the world.”

We’ll talk a bit about why Lewis felt that way and we will talk more about the structure of the poem, particularly the seemingly abrupt shift from its observations about the glory of God revealed in the natural world (vs 1-6)to its commentary on the moral law (vs 7-11).

We’ll explore possible reasons why the writer was so exuberant about the law and how that emotion might be instructive to and appropriate for us in our day and time.

Augustine on Prayer

For the last two weeks we’ve been talking about prayer and particularly Saint Augustine’s advice to Anicia Proba about how to pray aright. Augustine tells her that we must first recognize our own “desolation” before our prayers will be what they ought to be. That is, we must acknowledge the truth that our deepest desire is for God and that nothing else – wealth, success, popularity, fame – will fulfill us. It is not that we are destitute like the man under the bridge, but rather, no matter how good or great our earthly lot may be, our true desire is for God. As the hymn writer put it so long ago:

From the best bliss that Earth imparts
We turn unfilled to thee again

Augustine says, in effect, that only when we take notice that our hearts, left alone, are disordered, that is, that we have a dogged and chronic tendency to put things that should be second and third place into first place, only then will our prayers be what they ought to be. So when we start to pray, our first request might be:

Come Thou fount of every blessing
Tune my heart to sing thy grace . . .

Church Building

Yes, we all know that the church is not the building. How many times have we heard that. True, of course. The church is the body of believers. The church is the body of Christ.

Nonetheless, the church through the ages has invested mightily in beautiful buildings. No doubt that the woods are full of modern critics right now who would poo-poo all of that, claiming that all that is really necessary for worship is a place for them to plug in their stratocasters and sound systems. But here is a nice little meditation on the importance of church buildings. I, for one, am very grateful for the beautiful sanctuary we have at 1BC SA. I think it inspires reverence and gives us a boost to thinking about something greater than ourselves and greater than the mundane.

http://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/the-architecture-of-the-benedict-option/